RESPONSE PLANS TO INCLUDE PLAYGROUND EQUIPMENT

We often speak to food service operators about having effective plans in place for responding to events involving vomit and/or diarrhea in their establishments.  We were recently reminded by the Georgia Department of Public Health’s Environmental Health Office of the current code requirements in this  area:  

“Chapter 511-6-1 requires operators to have procedures in place for responding to vomiting/diarrheal accidents [511-6-1-.03(6)] in the food service establishment and IF PRESENT playground equipment and associated areas, there needs to be a plan in place for operators to follow when responding to vomiting and diarrheal events there as well [511-6-1-.07(5)(b)3].”  

Please don’t forget that if establishments have playground equipment, there should be an approved plan for responding to such events if they occur there as well.  The disinfectants used for such purposes are to be effective against Norovirus.  Chlorine is a disinfectant that is approved to be used in response to an event, however, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has a list of others approved for use in response plans.  Click this link for an EPA list of effective disinfectants or go to the EPA’s website for more information.  Also, click here for an example of a response plan provided by the Centers for Disease Control.

 

 

 

 

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Chapel Hill Creamery Cheese Products Recall

Recall of Chapel Hill Creamery cheese products sold in Georgia over public health risks from Salmonella

Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary W. Black is alerting Georgians to the recall of various Chapel Hill Creamery cheese products, made in North Carolina and distributed in Georgia, due to potential health risks. Georgia Department of Agriculture (GDA) inspectors will be checking retail stores, distribution centers and warehouses to make sure the recalled products have been removed from sale. Here is the information via the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA):

Chapel Hill Creamery in Chapel Hill, NC, is recalling all Chapel Hill Creamery cheese products because of a potential association with an outbreak of Salmonella infections. Salmonella can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, the elderly, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea that is often bloody, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in more severe illnesses.

Health officials have identified recent cases of Salmonella infection in persons who consumed Chapel Hill Creamery products. To date, no illnesses have been confirmed in Georgia linked to this outbreak.

The recalled products were distributed at retail stores, farmers markets, and restaurants in Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, South Carolina and Virginia. The products involved in the recall include all codes, packages and sizes of the following varieties of cheese manufactured by Chapel Hill Creamery:

• Quark
• Danziger
• Swiss
• Paneer
• Calvander
• Hot Farmers Cheese
• New Moon
• Smoked Mozzarella
• Fresh Mozzarella
• Burrata
• Hickory Grove
• Carolina Moon
• Smoked Farmers Cheese
• Dairyland Farmers Cheese
• Pheta

Chapel Hill Creamery is working in cooperation with the public health and regulatory officials in North Carolina to identify the source of the Salmonella. The company will provide updated information on its website chapelhillcreamery.com as it becomes available; additionally, a local health department in North Carolina has provided a hot line (919) 245-2378 for questions.

This is one of several recalls impacting Georgia this week. To view a comprehensive list or sign up for e-mail alerts, please visit www.agr.georgia.gov/recalls.aspx. If this recall expands or additional details become available, the website will provide the most up-to-date information. Also follow the GDA on Twitter @GDAFoodSafety for recall alerts and food safety tips.

Straight From The Field: DETACHABLE PARTS

The photo below is of an in-use chopper’s face-plate that was observed during a recent food service inspection performed by one of our inspectors.

CHOPPER
Her account follows:

The employee told me the piece didn’t come off, so I showed him the wing nuts and he pried it apart Jen%20Mestawith a spatula.  The manager saw the photo and decided they needed a new one
because of the broken corner.  The employee thoroughly cleaned the piece before reattaching it to the chopper.

     – Jen Birdsong, EHS3

It is important that meat slicers, choppers, and all equipment with removable parts be taken apart for thorough cleaning to minimize the possibility of cross contamination.  The FDA has more information, along with a poster (available  in English and Spanish), for your use at the following link:

http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/RetailFoodProtection/IndustryandRegulatoryAssistanceandTrainingResources/ucm240666.htm

Listeriosis Advisory Issued for Popular Blue Bell Single Serve Snacks

You may need to check your freezer!

Please click on the following link for more information from the Georgia Department of Agriculture:

http://agr.georgia.gov/consumer-advisory-issued-for-ice-cream-products-from-blue-bell-creameries.aspx

If we can be of further assistance, contact Angie Davis, Certified Inspection/Training Officer, Cobb & Douglas Public Health at 678-385-5093.

Random Violations from the Field – Food Contact Surfaces and Holding Temperatures

The following are violations cited by inspectors in the field based on the Rules and Regulations for Food Service CHAPTER 290-5-14

 

EHFood DishwasherFood Contact Surfaces Cleaned and Sanitized

Contributed by: Kim Brown, EHS3

 

Food Service Inspection Item Number 4-2b

Code Provisions: .05(7)(a)1

Observation: Numerous plates, bowls, and utensils stored as clean observed with stuck-on food debris.

Compliance/Corrective Action (CA) Required: All food contact surfaces must be properly cleaned to sight and touch prior to being stored for use.

Corrected on sight during the inspection (COS):  Items were removed for cleaning.

 

 

Proper Cold Holding TemperaturesEHFood Crawfish

Contributed by: Casey Saenz

 

Food Service Inspection Item Number  6-1A

 Code Provisions: .04(6)(f)

Observation:  Time/Temperature Controlled for Safety (TCS) foods held above 41 ̊F in that crawfish was 48 ̊F, fish heads 52 ̊F, raw shrimp 48 ̊F while stored in the cook-line refrigerator.

Compliance/Corrective Action (CA) Required:  Always cold hold TCS foods at 41 ̊f and below.

Corrected on sight during the inspection (COS):  Food items were discarded since believed to have been out of temperature more than 4 hours .