WHAT’S THAT TEMPERATURE?

by Parish Divinity, EHS

As the holiday season approaches and new menu items start appearing, emphasis is again placed on the proper cooking of foods.  Time and temperature control for safety foods that require cooking are considered “cooked” only after they have been heated to the minimum cook temperatures designated for the particular food item.  This minimum cook temperature must be reached in order to kill harmful bacteria such as Salmonella and E. coli 0157.  Color and texture alone won’t tell you whether your food is done. Instead, use a food thermometer to be verify the food’s internal temperature.   When checking the temperature of food, always check the temperature in at least two locations, and at least one of those temperatures should be measured in the thickest part of the food (if applicable).

Test your knowledge by taking this short Minimum Internal Cooking Temperatures Quiz provided by ServSafe.

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Update Regarding E. coli O157:H7 Linked to Romaine Lettuce

Georgia is among 19 states, at this time, that have confirmed cases of persons that have become ill with E. coli infections linked to romaine lettuce grown in the region of Yuma, Arizona.  The following is advice from the CDC to food service operators and retailers:

  • Do not serve or sell any romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona growing region. This includes whole heads and hearts of romaine, chopped romaine, and salads and salad mixes containing romaine lettuce.
  • Food service operators and retailers should ask their suppliers about the source of their romaine lettuce.

Visit Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers on the CDC’s website for more detailed guidance concerning the outbreak.