WHO IS MORE LIKELY TO GET A FOODBORNE ILLNESS?

The CDC has posters available to remind us of the groups that are more likely to get a food borne illness (FBI).  These posters provide information that care givers and food safety workers can use to help prevent FBIs .  Follow this link for more content:  https://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/education-month.html

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Culture of Food Safety Quiz

The National Restaurant Association has provided a short Culture of Food Safety Quiz–in both English and Spanish– to test your food safety knowledge in recognition of Week 1 of Food Safety Education Month.  Downloadable posters for Week 1 –in both English and Spanish– are also available for your use.

Direct link for Week 1 quiz:  https://www.servsafe.com/Landing-Pages/National-Food-Safety-Month/NFSM-Docs/2017-NFSM-Activity-Week-1.aspx

Direct link for Week 1 posters: https://www.servsafe.com/Landing-Pages/National-Food-Safety-Month/NFSM-Docs/2017-NFSM-Poster-Week-1.aspx 

FDA MYTH BUSTER – FOOD SAFETY EDUCATION MONTH (WEEK 1)

MYTH: Only kids eat raw cookie dough and cake batter. If we just keep kids away from the raw products when adults are baking, there won’t be a problem!

FACT: Just a lick can make you sick! 
No one of any age should eat raw cookie dough or cake batter because it could contain germs that cause illness. Whether it’s pre-packaged or homemade, the heat from baking is required to kill germs that might be in the raw ingredients. The finished, baked, product is far safer – and tastes even better! So don’t do it! And remember, kids who eat raw cookie dough and cake batter are at greater risk of getting food poisoning than most adults are.

Random Violations from the Field – Food Contact Surfaces and Holding Temperatures

The following are violations cited by inspectors in the field based on the Rules and Regulations for Food Service CHAPTER 290-5-14

 

EHFood DishwasherFood Contact Surfaces Cleaned and Sanitized

Contributed by: Kim Brown, EHS3

 

Food Service Inspection Item Number 4-2b

Code Provisions: .05(7)(a)1

Observation: Numerous plates, bowls, and utensils stored as clean observed with stuck-on food debris.

Compliance/Corrective Action (CA) Required: All food contact surfaces must be properly cleaned to sight and touch prior to being stored for use.

Corrected on sight during the inspection (COS):  Items were removed for cleaning.

 

 

Proper Cold Holding TemperaturesEHFood Crawfish

Contributed by: Casey Saenz

 

Food Service Inspection Item Number  6-1A

 Code Provisions: .04(6)(f)

Observation:  Time/Temperature Controlled for Safety (TCS) foods held above 41 ̊F in that crawfish was 48 ̊F, fish heads 52 ̊F, raw shrimp 48 ̊F while stored in the cook-line refrigerator.

Compliance/Corrective Action (CA) Required:  Always cold hold TCS foods at 41 ̊f and below.

Corrected on sight during the inspection (COS):  Food items were discarded since believed to have been out of temperature more than 4 hours .

 

Stories from the Field – Teachable Moments

Contributed by Jen Mesta, Environmental Health Specialist 3

Improper Cooling

On a recent inspection in a full-service restaurant, I did a quick walk-through of the kitchen to see what activities were going on. I notice the racks of meat cooling and the nine or so sealed bags of hot cooked greens out on a prep table. Deciding to begin the formal inspection, I kept the greens in the corner of my eye for a few moments. Although there was active monitoring of the cooling of the meat, there was…no activity, no movement to get vegetables cooling rapidly. After talking with management about the greens the thought was because they are vegetables, they don’t pose a foodborne illness risk.   TEACHABLE MOMENT, I live for this stuff…

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